Skip to main content

About your Search

English 25
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
, makes $174,000. >> pelley: nancy, thank you. washington state's new marijuana law went into effect today, make together first state to legalize the drug for recreational use for people 21 or older. john blackstone tells us those that are supposed to enforce law are a little foggy on the details. >> reporter: at seattle police headquarters, jonah spangenthal lee was given the task of explaining the state state's new marijuana law on an online guide. >> what do you call it? mari-what? the guide to legal pot use in seattle. >> reporter: a lot of people are saying, thattix. it will take a year for the state to write regulations for selling marijuana illegally. for now, that leaves some confusion gaffes. for example, it's still illegal to smoke pot publicly, but last night teem peepdid. let me get this straight-- you can possess it, you can buy it, but nobody is allowed to sell it. >> that's correct. >> reporter: and nobody is allowed to grow it right now, either. >> that's correct as well. >> reporter: so how do you get legal pot? >> i couldn't tell you. >> reporter: the new law passed with
for those who want to see same-sex marriage become the law of the land. meanwhile, in egypt, they are just trying to get a functioning government off the ground. we'll go live to cairo where along with tear gas the words in the air today are martial law. >>> first, though, some developing news from south africa where nelson mandela is in the hospital right now. the former president is undergoing medical tests. that's according to the government. these tests have been planned for some time, we're told. they are consistent with his age. he is 94 years old. a family friend not saying how long mandela will be hospital iced, but a government spokesman insists there's, quote, no cause for alarm. mandela spent some time in the hospital earlier this year. he had stomach surgery. he became a bona fide world icon after spending some 27 years in prison for fighting against apartheid. in 1994, he became president of the country where he had been imprisoned. >>> to the fiscal cliff now. the clock continues to tick away. lawmakers now have just 24 days left to make a deal and avoid that combination of b
get everywhere because of the laws. and i know clint eastwood doesn't like these laws but tough. then you get to -- they want to extend it to europe, other countries we can travel, so people in this country can travel to those countries knowing they're not going to be handicapped any more than they are by facilities. why would a republican vote against such a deal? you first and then john. >> there's a lot of pressure from the right on this. there's the paranoia from the u.n. >> explain it. >> the notion that the u.n. is going to come in and tell us what to do. the fact of the matter is this treaty raises the world to the standard of the u.s. doesn't require the u.s. to change its standards at all and doesn't in any way give the u.n. power to do anything in this country. but i think it's -- all you have to do is say u.n. and people on the right get very exorcised. rick santorum helped lead the opposition to this treaty. i think he's out of step with the american people, out of step, by the way, on this tax cuts for the rich stuff. you know, bobby jindal said today, and i thought
couples started lining up for licenses when washington's law allowing gay marriage went into effect. they require a three day waiting period. so today is the first day couples can marry. 140 same sex couples are going to marry later on today. >>> the new gay marriage law comes as the supreme court announces it will review same-sex marriage including proposition 8. it will look at a challenge that denies them the benefits that the heterosexual couples receive. the supreme court reviewed to look at the challenge which bans gay marriage in california. they will hear argumentses in march and with rulings expected by june. >>> a group is urging the photograph to ban the salvation army. they made the request after a student acted and said the homeless shelter and soup kitchens refused to offer same sex couples. and a woman was teed access to a women's shelter. >>> the campus at san bernardino said they not and killed a student. few tails have been released. they were forced to fire their weapons after a graduate students became violent. he was treated for life-threatening injuries. >>> a
initiatives decriminalized the recreational use of pot. but it is still illegal under federal law. options for the administration include preventing the states from regulating and taxing marijuana or cutting off federal cash. a new jersey town acting like the grinch trying to tear down one man's christmas spirit. the fight is over this 400-foot inflatable santa. the owner of seasonal world says there is no ordinance but he has been issued five tickets ordering him to take it down. the mayor calling it a hazard because it could blow over. >> what i do every year and i have been doing it for 12 years and they have been basically harassing me for 12 years. >> the owner of seasonal world says he has no intention of moving santa and he will take the battle to court after christmas. a fireworks display in burma goes terribly wrong when explosions go off into the crowd. [screams] >> you can hear the screams. this is a festival and hot air balloons were filled were fireworks. they were sent into the air. one balloon started exploding too soon and the fires shot into the crowd. people ran for their
for energy information. we are by law -- it is supposed to be unbiased and neutral in our development of energy analysis, using the debt that we collect -- data that we collect. the annual energy outlook reference case, which were published today, is not really a forecast as it is a baseline. it is built on the idea of existing law and regulation so that the public and policymakers can compare what new laws and regulations or changes in world events might mean to our baseline. host: frank verrastro doggett is vice president of the energy program at the nonprofit center for strategic and international studies. who uses these eia projections? guest: the data sets the reference cases. they're not really pinpoints, because nobody gets 24 the right. but the trends are really important -- 2040 right. but the trends are really important. agencies around the world, universities, financial analysts on wall street, everyone uses these kinds of reports to look at what the forecast on this change in energy landscape looks like. host: we are taking your calls and questions for both mr. for siemins
said in a law that they would pay that money back in a trust fund. but there is suspicion on whether that is rarely ever going to happen. that feeds into their concern about what will happen to social security. is it going to be changed in ways that affect the benefits? host: all of the calls to simplify the tax code, to streamline it, and that may certainly mean to itemize the credits of that take place on the tax returns. guest: the complexity of the tax system is a huge problem. everyone from the irs on down to congress and the industry out there, if you will, the financial accounting industry, everyone recognizes is an enormous problem and causes people to pay a lot more than they otherwise would. most people do not do their own taxes anymore because they are so complex. they rely on software that is kind of a black box. it is hard to know how the tax system works anymore. people do not have as much of an incentive to take a deduction if they do not know it is there. and the software is what they are depending on. host: does simplifying the tax code as necessarily mean lessening
different laws than we do. if there say technology drain, it's also in terms of the u.s. laws we only prohibit certain type of technology that has to do with national security and technology. but when you talk in steve's case the talent of the invite tive things that get sucked out along with that, that's nobody really talks about that so i'd like to hear from you. >> it's true. what you are saying is true. it goes back to what i was saying the other countries are being a magnet for talent, there is no question about this so we have to recognize that is happening and make sure we're competitive. my own view is if people want to come here and get an education and go back to their country, fine, that is a way to build stronger committees in other parts of the world. that is part of our stated policy. having people come here if they want to go back and start companies there, that's fine. but we should at least give them the option of staying here. if they want to go back fine, but don't force them. encourage them to stay because we need smart people here working on these new technologies
to break open the atm. >>> there is a renewed push in virginia tonight to change the laws when it comes to texting and driving. police need another reason to pull you over. texting while driving is a secondary offense. adam tuss explains how one local county is getting around the rules to hand out more tickets and stop the dangerous and growing problem. >> reporter: you don't have to be out on the roads long to see it. drivers texting. some even cruising down the interstate at high speeds. we saw this driver rolling along at 60 miles per hour today. he just kept rolling, and rolling, and about 20 seconds later put down the phone. here in fairfax county, police have been using a law called failure to pay full-time attention to pull over drivers who are texting, or are distracted behind the wheel. >> not a day goes by that people don't notice other drivers texting while driving. and our officers are doing what they can to enforce this. >> reporter: and she tells news4 these kinds of violations have skyrocketed. in 2009, about 7,000 offenses. in 2010, over 9,000. last year, and this year,
. but at the same time, richard, boehner seems to be laying down the law with this house republican caucus. he stripped four house members of committee seats, presumably because they bucked the party on key votes. three of those congressional members were elected during the tea party victory in 2010. >> yeah, look, reverend, it's not his legacy on the line here. it's his job on the line here. one of the problems he's had all the way through is he's had eric cantor hyped hbehind him poised challenge him for the leadership. he has to play a difficult game here where he has to assert his leadership, not expose himself too much to that challenge. that makes actually negotiating with him extremely difficult. republicans have to decide who they are, what they stand for, other than opposing everything that the president does, other than supporting every single tax cut that anyone could ever support. that's easy, right? now that they've lost, they have to decide who they are. and in the house they have to decide which leader they want. is this john boehner's caucus? is it eric cantor's caucus? negotia
in law that would help us avoid the kind of obstruction and the kind of showdowns we have had in the past over the debt ceiling. in fact, the idea was not new. it was his original idea that has been the law of the land that followed. and he offered and challenged senator reid to bring this matter for consideration by the senate. he said he would bring this to a vote in 20 minutes. and we would decide up or down whether the debt ceiling problem would be resolved once and for all under senator mcconnell proposal. and then senator mcconnell objected, say, no, no, we need 60 votes. for those who do not follow the senate, 60 votes is equivalent to a filibuster vote. so this may be a moment in senate history when a senator made a proposal, and when given a opportunity for a vote, he filibustered his own proposal. i think we have reached a new spot in the history of the senate we have never seen before. i will ask a parliamentarian to really look into this. i don't think this has ever happened before. but this calls into question if this was a kind of offer that would consider to be good faith.
coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. open enrollment ends dember 7th. so now's the time. visit or call 1-800-medicare. [ male announcer ] jill and her mouth have lived a great life. but she has some dental issues she's not happy about. so i introduced jill to crest pro-health for life. selected for people over 50. pro-health for life is a toothpaste that defends against tender, inflamed gums, sensitivity and weak enamel. conditions people over 50 experience. crest pro-health for life. so jill can keep living the good life. crest. life opens up when you do. >> welcome back. a cabinet shake-up. new reports that president obama is closer to naming new members among the decisions, is who will replace secretary of state hillary clinton. will it be u.n. ambassador susan rice or john kerry? >> well, for defense secretary who will it be? senator john kerry possible for that. and of course the vietnam vet later turned against the war and raises a huge red flag in the near future and the veterans for america join us
different laws than we do. my question is if there is a technology drain, in terms of the u.s. laws, we only prohibit certain types of technology that has to do with national security and technology, but when you talk about in steve's case, it innovative things that are basically getting sucked out all along with that, nobody really talks about that. so i would like to hear from you. >> it is true. exactly what you are saying is true. other countries are stepping up their efforts to be a magnet for talent. some of it is professors, some of it is researchers, and there is no doubt. we just have to make sure we are aware of that. people want to come here and get an education and want to go back to their country, fine. it is a way to build centers of innovation and entrepreneurship in other parts of the world. that is actually part of our state department stated policy. having people come here, if they want to go back and start companies there, that is fine. but we should at least give them the option of staying year. if they want to go back, fine. but do not make them go back. people staying y
on sharia law. it is by its very nature anti-west, anti-democratic, anti-liberal and anti-peace. it's interests are opposite to ours. this is islamism, it is the opposite of democracy. democracy -- people are the source of legitimacy. periodic elections to choose one's representatives. the idea that the political minority can eventually become the majority. respect for certain rights. protection for the rights of religious and ethnic minorities. protection that goes beyond tolerance and of course the rule of law, the respect for a judiciary that is independent. today's debate is simple. we aren't asking whether they can be good muslims and good democrats, the answer to that is yes. but can islammists be democrat. can advocates of the ideology of fundamentalism lead their countries to democracy? the answer is an obvious no. our answer is grounded inexperience and fact. their answer is grounded in hope and assertion. we have experiences, iran, gaza, sudan, lebanon, turkey, in none of these countries have the attributes of democracy occurred when islammists were in power. rights are re
that option open. so while it's technically not illegal under international law for him to have this capability these are very, very dangerous products. gregg: speaking of illegal, people who commit crimes against humanity, war crimes are held in the dock at the international criminal court in the hague. there is talk now that bashar al-assad may try to seek asylum. should the u.s. position be no, you must be held to account for what you've done, or let's just get him out of here? >> well, i don't think the international criminal court is a legitimate organization under any circumstances, but in this case i think it posts the hard question whether this determination to prosecute somebody doesn't cause more death and destruction than giving somebody like bashar al-assad immunity, getting them out of the country and trying to end this conflict. the problem is it's hard to see who can give him that real grant, maybe the russians and that's why there is reporting that they are talking to bashar al-assad. but one reason i think he and other dictators tend to stay to the end is they d
that the electoral law allows for them residing outside of the country to vote. working in collaboration with organizations such as the office of the high commissioner for the refugees that speaks with displaced persons and refugees the government could take steps to allow the significant population of refugees in the neighboring countries and the internally displaced persons to hold the region's. at the same time, as logistically challenging as it may be, holding elections in the major cities and in the northern regions would be this strong guest impossible of mali's sovereignty or territory and steps of rebuilding a democracy. the transition government is government plans and actions to the public and the crisis of legitimacy. the international community needs to harmonize its approach toward the pursuit of the polls that could lead to the legitimately elected government and military actions to detect the north. the contradictory public that take the military option off the table in the short and medium-term may only serve to emboldened the extra hauling them time to reinforce their pr
government. united nations is going to be -- you know, dictating american law and things like that. look, all of the crazy talk they did for the first four years and then we had election -- the american people said yeah, we like that guy. none of this is -- i think they're going to spin the tales for four more years because they sound, for that echochamber it sounds fun. >> stephanie: ben stein on o'reilly. >> a lot of angry, bitter people out there. they've got to attack something. so they attack christmas. they're not -- i don't consider them well in the head. >> what! >> nobody is being forced to bow down and worship anybody. nobody is being forced to do anything against his will. if you drive by a crash how are you possibly harmed by that? how can you be harmed by that? >> i thought he was going to talk about susan rice. >> stephanie: eric you know why he had to join the war on christmas, because he stepped off the reservation saying the rich people should pay more in taxes a couple of weeks ago. so i think he had
extended all of those changes in 2010. that's the law of the land still today. tax policy has been exactly the same over this continuum. what has changed, mr. speaker, what has changed is the spending. the reason deficits have grown not one, not two, not three but almost four times larger than the previous record deficit in american history is not because tax policy has changed, it hasn't. it's because federal spending policy has changed. and that's what we have to get our arms around here in this body. what i show going forward, mr. speaker, put a little square around the annual budget deficits that have been run during the first four years of the obama administration, but i also project what the congressional budget office believes, that's a nonpartisan budget planning group we have here on capitol hill, what they believe is in store for us in the future if we continue under current policy. -h tsh-that's trillion dollar deficits going out for years to come. the problem is not tax policy, mr. speaker, the problem is spending policy. can we improve tax policy? you better believe it. mr. sp
.d. laws disproportionately affecting minorities, it applies to me that somehow we have something missing in our brain. white americans can and get i.d.'d to vote and can follow the laws, so what are you telling what people? they're not good enough? this is what bothers me about a lot of rhetoric coming from democrats and the left. we always have to make a specialness when we deal with minorities because they are too feeble minded. we have to make concessions because they cannot follow the rules. when you treat people like it does, i do not think they want to inspire. >> the editor of conservative black, crystal wright. >> editors say hurricane a sandy caused $5 billion to four infrastructure -- -- poor infrastructure damage in their state. >> good morning. i welcome everyone to today's hearing which have called to address the devastating impact that super-storm sandy had a run -- had on our regional transportation, the most widely new transportation network and unprecedented damage to our system and estimates of the damage have reached more than an $7 billion. across the regent
this detention center. and it follows what was arguably the most bizarre day in his month-long run from the law. [ sirens blaring ] instead of being deported to belize in handcuffs on thursday, a seemingly unconscious john mcafee is wheeled into a hospital on a gurney. mcafee's month-long game of cat and mouse with authorities in two countries, ended with a sudden emergency. the software anti-virus pioneer, apparently suffering from a heart problem thursday morning, became unresponsive in this immigration detention center. mcafee telling abc news -- >> i simply passed out. and i think that's the combination of stress and everything else. i hit my head. >> reporter: a dramatic scene, with this ambulance powering through a thicket of cameramen. mcafee, in the back of the ambulance, lying prone on a headboard, eyes closed. then, the chase. tv crews careening through guatemala's narrow streets. the press, pursuing mcafee on this gurney, right into the emergency room. as medics transferred him to a bed and began undressing him, suddenly, the man who appeared nearly dead, spoke. >> please, not in fro
, washington state's law allowing recreational marijuana described as one of the most liberal in the world went into effect midnight last night. the state will start licensing farms and retail stores to grow and sell marijuana next year. police across the state are said to be taking a laissez-faire approach. >> where's that willie geist? actually, that's heilmann. you know, i'm surprised connecticut has a pretty darn liberal law. >> colorado. >> colorado, man. >> what's in "parade" this week, joe? >> in "parade" this week, winners of their first annual holiday bake-off. >> oh, good, maybe good recipes. >> in "parade" magazine. >> i want to make cookies. >> i'm sure as a marijuana -- >> now, stop p continue look how adorable that picture is. i'm going to make cookies just like that this weekend. >> chow on those and marijuana. >> stop it. >>> mike allen is here with the morning "playbook." we haven't talked a whole lot about jim demint leaving. i had a call with him yesterday, and he said and he believed, and i certainly understand it, he's leaving because he'll have more money running the herit
the rates? >> you can do it mathematically. it works. you can write laws that do it. the question you have to say to yourself, do you want to start eliminating charitable deductions for state and local taxes, for charitable, for health care, even, for retirement funds? in other words, do you really want to turn people's behavior kind of inside-out almost overnight by changing the way taxes work so quickly? >> mark, you're as plugged in as anybody in washington right now. are these guys talking to each other in a real, meaningful way? i know they put out the information that the president talked to john boehner yet, but are there real behind-the-scenes intense negotiations as we're now four weeks away from this thing? >> in talking to people so both sides yesterday, they had the identical message which is the other side isn't ready to listen yet, so we've just got to wait. that's obviously not a great environment to move things along. the optimists on both sides think we're going to get a deal, not by christmas, but by new year's. if you ask people, what's the next step? what gets things mo
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)